Announcing 10 Artmonk chapters. Are you an artmonk?

Posted by on Nov 29, 2010 in Otherhood | No Comments

Apropos of my recent posts on activism and monasticism, and the fact that I’ll be working on developing the San Francisco chapter, I repost this, written by the Labro artmonks: The Art Monastery Project has launched Artmonk chapters in the following 10 cities: Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Reno, Bloomington, Indiana, Chicago, Buffalo, New York City. If you are an Artmonk […]

“The monastery is neither a museum nor an asylum…

Posted by on Nov 13, 2010 in Otherhood | No Comments

“The monastery is neither a museum nor an asylum. The monk remains in the world from which the monk has fled, and the monk remains a potent, though hidden, force in that world. Beyond all the works which may accidentally attach themselves to the vocation, the monk acts on the world simply by being a […]

Architecti et usus meditatio: Vitruvian Echoes in Contemplative Practice

Posted by on Nov 4, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Wednesday, December 1, 2010 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EST: This Webinar will explore the effects of Vitruvius’s 1st century BCE descriptions of meditatio and contemplatio as they ripple through the history of architecture’s practices. Vitruvius’s words establish meditatio–from the Greek medesthai–as the essential mode in which architects do their work: the singular practice of […]

NaNoWriMo: A Self-Guided Artmonk Retreat

Posted by on Nov 3, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

I’m 5,000 words into writing 50,000 words of novel for NaNoWriMo—National Novel Writing Month. What appealed to me about NaNoWriMo (enough to clear out my schedule a bit and make the commitment), and what I believe appeals to many of the 172, 000 participants who will make some kind of attempt to complete a 50,000-word novel […]

“They call it Christianity. I call it consciousness.” —Emerson

Posted by on Oct 27, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

via the church and postmodern culture: conversation, in a post on multitasking.via the church and postmodern culture: conversation, in a post on multitasking.

Cyborg Buddha | Philippe Verdoux | On Why It Might Be Wise To Think More About Wisdom

Posted by on Oct 17, 2010 in Otherhood | No Comments

“In a world torn with strife and warfare, perhaps no problem is more important [than that of understanding and developing wisdom], as wisdom may be the only hope out of the bloodshed.” – Robert Sternberg … But what exactly is wisdom? Would augmenting our cognitive capacities entail a corresponding increase in how wise we as […]

Chapter 8 of Augustine’s Rule

Posted by on Oct 9, 2010 in Blog | No Comments

Starting on October 2nd, I’ll be doing a Jesuit retreat on the Rule of Augustine (which I’ve written about here: “Up to our necks in Augustine”). Each day, I’ll read 1 of the 8 chapters of the Rule of Augustine: Chapter VIII of Augustine’s Rule Observance of the Rule 1. The Lord grant that you may observe […]

Intrapreneur’s Ten Commandments

Posted by on Oct 2, 2010 in Otherhood | No Comments

[Part of the Daily Lectio series, named after the Benedictine tradition of lectio divina, “divine reading.” For instructions and background on the series, click here. Subscribe to Daily Lectio. Send comments or suggested readings to nathan@artmonastery.org] Gifford Pinchot III is one of the co-founders of the Bainbridge Graduate Institute, where I went for an MBA in Sustainable Community Economic […]

Monastics, Dependent Origination & Climate Crisis

Posted by on Sep 28, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

[Part of the Daily Lectio series, named after the Benedictine tradition of lectio divina, “divine reading.” For instructions and background on the series, click here. Subscribe to Daily Lectio. Send comments or suggested readings to nathan@artmonastery.org] Take your pick:

Western Lineage

Posted by on Sep 27, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

The Rule of Benedict draws on the Egyptian tradition (Eastern), such as the Pachomian rule; the Cappadocian tradition (Eastern), such as Basil’s rule; and the North African tradition (Western), such as Augustine’s rule. The third was a more direct influence than the second, but the first was the most influential, coming through John Cassian and then […]